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At the heart of every project, there is
a campaignable idea that expresses
our clients proposition in a simple,
confident and compelling manner.

Adams & Harlow Brand Identity

Telling the truth about extraordinary pork pies...

We delivered: Naming / Logotype / Packaging / Illustration / Website

Brief

George Adams is a well-established family-run firm of butchers in Spalding, Lincolnshire. Noting growing demand for their range of pork pies specially made for the prestigious Fortnum & Mason store, they decided to create their own pork pie brand. In this way, the firm hoped to appeal to retailers and end consumers and fill a gap in the luxury savoury snack market.

Our task was to create a contemporary brand identity for the pork pie range with a credible 100-year heritage…without telling porkies.

Solution

Our clients were two sisters whose grandfathers from both sides of the family ran rival Lincolnshire pork pie businesses back in the1900s. This slice of family history led to our idea.

With illustrations based on archive photographs of Mr Adams and Mr Harlow, we created a brand story based on the friendly rivalry between the two men. Always trying to out-do each other, each tells tall stories about their ‘extraordinary pork pies’.

Using a blend of quirky illustrations and old-fashioned typography, we created a brand with both heritage and modernity. Honest.

Results

Adams & Harlow pork pies gained a great deal of interest from retailers during trade show events and they are now stocked in many quality delis and food departments throughout the UK, including Fortnum & Mason. Demand is so great that the factory operates 24/7 to keep up with orders.

The identity features Illustrations of both Mr Adams* & Mr Harlow based on photographic reference. Across the brand they continue their longstanding friendly rivalry, both attempting to out-do each other with their "extraordinary pork pies". *Mr Adams is wearing a 'Pork pie hat', which he was known for wearing.

The bespoke logotype is based on a simple sans-serif font common in the early 1900s, it has some quirks within the lettering to make it unique. The ‘S’ is based on a meat hook, reference to the butchers heritage.

Each of the pies is colour coded using a the brand colour palette of muted tones.